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the 6 worst questions to ask in an

The sun is out, the iced-coffees are flowing, the patios are packed. What better time to…interview? Yes! The early summer months are a great time to look for a new job or at the very least, to get out and build your network.

Consider this:

– Year-end goals are still a focus this time of year but the pressure isn’t on yet. You can be a solution!

– Most people wait until the end of the year to look for a new job and are in “summer” mode so the competition is less fierce.

Granted, some decision makers may not be in the office as regularly so the process can take longer but if you have patience, getting in during the summer months can have you a step ahead.

Imagine it: you’ve landed yourself an interview with a company that ticks all your boxes. You smoothly answer the questions asked, you’ve built a healthy rapport, things are going well.

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Interviewing is like dating. You never know what you’re going to get until you’re in too deep.

Throughout my years as a recruiter and hiring manager, I’ve been a part of some outrageous interviews, from those looking to find employment through my company and those looking to get promoted within the company. It’s a tricky process. And sometimes it feels like there’s a secret code that no one talks about.

In my attempt to help make your inevitable career transition (at some point) easier, I’m putting together some free resources for you to keep on file. I’ve surveyed dozens of hiring managers and recruiters and have put together a short list of 6 things EVERY interviewer hates.

Some of them seem obvious and some even seem petty but interviewers are a sticky bunch. The more you understand them (agreeing with them or not isn’t the point), the better your chances of getting a job or getting ahead.

6 Things

 

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Are you a list person? IMG_4877

I’m a post-it and scribble person (I had to attach this picture from a few months ago because if you saw my desk right now you’d worry about me!).

The notes help me get my thoughts out. However, there are occasions when I’ve wished for a simple checklist with nothing more and nothing less than what I need to do.

As I mentioned last week, I’m on a mission to provide you with all the tools necessary to make a career change whenever that time may be. This week I’m sharing one of the resources reserved for my 1 on 1 clients that’s proven helpful.

Most of us will change jobs between 7 and 12 times in our careers so this might just come in handy one day!

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I just read that the word literally has an updated definition in the dictionary. So many people were using it incorrectly (as in how they use figuratively) that we’ve literally changed the meaning of the word. Isn’t that crazy?

Another thing we’ve accepted as the norm is that career transition is a part of life. In fact, most people will have anywhere from 7-12 jobs in their lifetime. That’s a lot of change!

Because job transition is totally within my sweet spot having been a former recruiter, hiring manager and boss, I’ve decided to dedicate the next few posts to supporting you in your inevitable job search by providing insider knowledge on the process.

Hopefully if you’re quitting your job it’s for another one and you’ve thought it through. Often we see a higher salary or a dreamy office environment and are quick to decide that it must be a better opportunity.

In order to be sure about that, get clear on what you’re moving toward and away from and why.

Change is inevitable but that doesn’t mean we should take it lightly. Each move should be strategic, slowly writing your career story over time.

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Here goes: 5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Quitting Your Job

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Can you relate? A client of mine got a call out of the blue from a friend asking if she’d be interested in a position at her company. She wasn’t looking for a job and couldn’t help but feel flattered.

We researched the company, the people they hired, their objectives and industry trends. My client was sharp and ready for her interview; she knew how to explain what she wanted and how she could make an impact at the new company. I’m talking stellar.

And yet, she didn’t get the job.  [click to continue…]

We all have one and whether it’s good or not, we have doubts from time to time. I’m talking about a resume. If you’re in the heat of a job search or just shining up your resume just in case, run your resume past these quick tips to be sure you’re not missing anything.

As VP of an international recruiting company, I’ve interviewed hundreds of people and have assisted hiring managers in hiring their own staff. I’ve seen some killer resumes and some that were…well, horrific. From Glamour head shots and lengthy explanations as to why they left each and every position, to descriptions of food allergies and bad jokes that don’t translate on paper, I’ve seen it all.

A resume is like the pilot of a TV show. It has to gain interest, show what it can do and where it could go in a small amount of time.

Instead of presenting yourself in a way that’ll get you the job, it’s best to look for a position where you can gain experience and use the expertise you already have to make an impact. You can showcase this when your resume checks these 3 boxes:  [click to continue…]

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A guy with paperclips in the place of buttons. The woman in the furry suit (covered in dog hair). The cocky go-getter. The all-too-comfortable “people person.” The desperate “yes” woman.

Do you know these people? I do. I’ve interviewed them all, and not for entry level positions but for high level and management positions. You may be thinking, well, I don’t have a dog and all my shirts have buttons so I’ll never be “that guy.” Hear me out.

I’ve interviewed hundreds of people in my career. As VP of an international recruiting firm I interviewed lawyers, recruiters, account executives and managers.

The interview process is confusing and stressful for even the most polished and qualified person. The goal is not just to be prepared but to make an impact. These insider tips will have them begging for more.  [click to continue…]